What we have been doing lately news

Summer Break

We are going on a trip and will close our shop for a few weeks. We will process your orders as soon as we return in September. Happy summer to all!

July 2022

We’ve been in our studio designing, making and coding our fermenter prototypes for a long time now and we miss sharing real moments with you around healthy and sustainable food. But we are getting there! So what are we busy with now?

  • We are finishing the fermenter, we can see the end! We still have a few details to work out, but basically we’re getting there. Maud is finishing the last details of the cabinet so that it can be easily manufactured later on, while Antoine is coding the interface of the electronics, so that it will be the easiest to use, by all. It’s taking us longer than expected, as we’re learning a lot along the way, but wow what an experience.
  • We are documenting our entire process, from design to fabrication to use, as always we want to be as inclusive as possible to bring together as many fermentistas as possible. we dream of a world where everyone enjoys delicious plant-based proteins, made at home in a conscious and environmentally friendly way.
  • We are designing a series of workshops around tempeh fermentation, but also about how to make the fermenter. If you are interested in this kind of workshop, please contact us.
  • We are preparing our summer holidays, where we will spend a few days in Belgium to see friends and family, and then we will go to the north of Spain to cycle the Camino de Compostela, we can’t wait!

Year in Review: 2021

Hello friends,

It’s been almost a year since we decided to fully dedicate ourselves to the Domingo Club and our mission to promote plant-based food, the practice of fermentation, interest in mushrooms, and making tools for anyone to start fermenting their food at home, teaming up with bacteria and fungi.

Let’s review 2021 with the main events of our year.

When Toni thinks of our new fermenter

March

Official launch of Domingo Club.

Our proposal was selected for Fab Lab Barcelona’s Food Tech 3.0 accelerator program and we decided to go all in. We went from side projects related to our personal fermentation practice to a design studio focused on sustainable food and tools for everyone to ferment at home.

We launched our website to document our daily practice and our Instagram page to reflect these changes to a growing audience.

April

We moved our 3D printer, wooden boards, electronic components, and boxes filled with a myriad of prototyping materials from our apartment to a space in the urban design district of Poblenou in Barcelona. Once an industrial area, it began a process of transformation and regeneration in the late 1990s and is now home to entrepreneurial hubs. We have a studio!

View of our studio

May

In order to stop the use of single-use plastic bags for tempeh production, we designed 3D printed tempeh moulds.

We entered our 3D printed tempeh moulds in an innovation challenge organised by WikiFactory and won the prize for best functionality. The judges said “Clever, simple, insightful and functional. Really the best design for easy manufacturability”.

Our first 3D printed tempeh mould

June

Domingo Club was selected and presented in the London Design Biennale’s “Design in Age of Crisis” exhibition. We proposed the idea of a BioLab kitchen, a kind of facility that anyone can easily build and use at home to reimagine all aspects of food, waste and living systems. Our proposal was to move from an extractive to a regenerative economy, observing and understanding natural systems for more synergies.

We were selected to be part of the innovative proteins cohort of the Food System Game Changers Lab acceleration program run by EAT, IDEO, Thought For Food, The Rockefeller Foundation, Forum for the Future, Meridian Institute, SecondMuse and Intention 2 Impact. We have discussed and researched with other initiatives that are having a positive impact on the global food system.

Makery (media for labs) came to interview us in our studio about our practice and projects. The transcript is online on their website.

July

Our tempeh incubator won the Distributed Design Excellence Award 2021, tackling all four core principles of the distributed design model: Open, Ecosystemic, Sustainable and Supportive! The Distributed Design Awards celebrate the best maker and design responses to the post-industrial design paradigm. These awards recognize the most innovative, supportive and sustainably designed projects across Europe.

We won the Excellence Award :)

We started a collaboration with Valentina from MyVeganFam as part of Hyper Global Hyper Local, a European maker exchange. Valentina is a professional tempeh maker based in Amsterdam. She gave us excellent feedback on our tempeh making tools, which gave us a better understanding of the practice from an experienced practitioner’s perspective.

Silicon tempeh mould prototype

August

We presented our open-source incubator remotely at the FAB16 Montreal, the worldwide event of the Fablab network. We gave a talk for the first time and we really enjoyed doing it. We covered topics such as: fermentation as a process of partnering with microorganisms; plant-based proteins as an effective solution for reducing greenhouse gas emissions; how to make tempeh; why we make open source tools; how to leverage the principles of distributed design and decentralised fabrication.

One of the slides we presented at FAB16 Montreal

September

We started our Tempeh Lunch series in our studio. Our Tempeh Lunch is a convivial moment where we cook a delicious tempeh dish and share it with friends and friends of friends. It’s great to see people discovering tempeh and loving it. Everything is vegan, local and organic and based on a pay-what-you-want system.

Poster we designed for our Tempeh Lunch series

We hosted an online event called Tempeh Dialogue with Valentina from MyVeganFam to publicly discuss our maker exchange on tempeh making tools, and answer questions from enthusiasts. It was great to connect with the fermenter community.

Final version of the 3D printed tempeh mould we made through the maker exchange

October

We participated in the Food Tech 3.0 Showcase. This was the closing event of the Food Tech 3.0 accelerator programme we have been participating in for the past six months. We took part in sessions with other (low) food tech related projects on alternative business systems, building community, using digital fabrication to prototype and bring our ideas to life. We showcased a new prototype of our tempeh incubator/fermenter and presented our overall Domingo Club project in a pecha-kucha format to a very enthusiastic audience.

Our tempeh fermenter prototype posing in the studio

We launched our e-shop with organic cotton tee-shirts designed by us and screen printed locally in Barcelona. This is a good way for people to support our project until our tools are ready (and a good excuse for Toni to get back to his drawing practice).

Our first batch of organic tee-shirt

Release of the Distributed Design Book that featured one of our articles. We wrote about our Domingo Club project, our vision and our values.

November

Release of our first product, after the tee-shirt, the Domingo necklace. A poetic invitation to all to start fermenting tempeh without any other device than your body. Wear it for a day or two to ferment your own plant proteins with your body heat. We make it ourselves in our workshop. It was great to see the audience getting excited about their tempeh-Tamagotchi.

The Domingo necklace on Maudi’s chest

We made another batch of tee-shirts because the previous one was sold out! Thank you all for your support! We adjusted the model choice to better suit our customers and added more sizes.

Toni proudly wearing the new black tee-shirt

We took part in the Poblenou Open Night at the Fab Lab Barcelona. A night in which the spaces of the Poblenou Urban District open their doors and offer a wide programme of cultural activities. We exhibited our prototype fermenter and the Domingo necklace.

Our fermenter prototype and tempeh necklace were presented at Foodture Barcelona, the summit of food design, food tech and social food. The event took place at the Barcelona Design Center.

Our tempeh fermenter at the Barcelona Design Center

December

We had a stand at the fermentation micro festival All Ferments alongside other fermenters: beer and kombucha brewers, kimchi and bread makers, fermented spicy sauces lovers. We presented the necklace in a very mushroomy set made of natural elements collected in the natural park nearby.

We co-organised an event called Movimiento & Tempeh with our friend Zarina Rondón. We proposed an event that nourishes the body, mind and soul through physical movement and sustainable food.

Poster we designed for the Movimiento & Tempeh event

We presented Domingo Club and sold necklaces and t-shirts at Festivalet, an important independent craft fair in Barcelona. We were able to present what we do and why we do it to an incredible number of people. It was great to see people’s reaction and get their opinions, as most of them didn’t know about tempeh or even fermentation. Feedback is a valuable resource for us, we are always on the lookout, so don’t hesitate if you want to share something with us.

Conclusion

We are very enthusiastic about this first year. We participated in an acceleration programme to structure our ideas and push us to go further, organised events around tempeh to make people want to taste it (and adopt it!), started selling the Domingo necklace to offer you a poetic entry into the wonderful world of fermentation and mushrooms. We presented our project and its values at several events and conferences. Our fermentation practice has become much more solid and constant.

With all this, we have received a lot of feedback on our fermenter prototype — thank you all. We are more motivated than ever to finalise the home version we have been working on since the beginning of the Domingo Club: a small device that anyone can have at home to start fermenting their own fermented food: tempeh, koji, sourdough, etc. We hope to launch it soon.

In the meantime our own funds have come to an end and we are currently looking for financing and partners to continue the development. Please contact us if you have any ideas that can help us. We are also looking for points of sale!

Us in our studio

Thank you all for the support, the discussions, the tee-shirts and necklaces you bought from us, the events you came and all the tempeh moments we shared together.

Happy new year,
~ Maudi and Toni

Exhibition: La irrupció

We have been invited to be part of a collective art exhibition about the climate and social crisis. Our fermenter necklace will represent our ideas, via the production and transformation of food at a hyper local level through the collaboration with fungi and microorganisms.

Barcelona, see you tonight at the opening, 7pm at the Santa Mònica Art Center on the Rambla.

Intermediate phase

Intermediate phase of the fermentation of a tempe(h), from adzuki beans in this case. When the mycelium, the roots of the fungi, have started to colonise the beans, but not yet completely. The tips of their branches start to touch, to connect. The mycelial network starts to feed on the beans, sharing its nutrients, breaking them down into smaller bits.

It is this process that interests us in tempe(h). This ability of the mycelium to pre-digest our food, to make its nutrients more accessible to us, so that we can enjoy it fully.

It’s such a beautiful process that we have access to, thanks to tempe(h) fermentation.

Calm technology

Calm technology. We need technological help to grow tempeh in places where the climate is not suitable for its growth. The idea of our fermenter is to replicate the Indonesian climate, to cooperate with nature and help it to help us. But the technology for our device doesn’t need to be intrusive, connected to the internet, track our habits or consume more energy than it actually needs. It just needs to produce heat according to what the growth of the mycelium requires. Only a few components are needed. A few components that we can understand, repair and improve if necessary. A few components that reconcile open-source technology with citizens and our food production. We like to call it calm technology.

What is in the image?

There is a small fan, a heating pad, an electronic board with a micro-controller, a screen and a button, and a temperature sensor. The sensor measures the temperature in the fermenter, the heating pad produces heat in exchange for electricity and the fan spreads it evenly. The interface (screen, button) allows the selection of the ideal temperature for the desired fermentation and the programming of a timer.